6 Newborn Care Tips for New Parents

Newborn Care Tips for New ParentsBringing home a newborn baby can be a very hectic, exciting, and confusing time for parents. There is so much information that you will learn on your own throughout the parenting process, but it never hurts to read up and do some research. While it can definitely be an overwhelming time in your life, all that matters is that you’re striving to be the best parent you can be. Here are some helpful tips for newborn care:

1. Early and Often

Anything that you expect your child to learn as they grow and develop be sure to start as early as possible. Get a head start on communicating with them, potty training, basic shapes and colors, counting, and anything else you can think of to practice. Even though you know they won’t be able to respond with words from the start, there’s nothing wrong with getting them used to communication.

2. Cry it Out

A newborn baby will inevitably cry – a lot! Since new parents aren’t familiar with this reaction to almost anything, it’s easy to see how this could cause some trouble. Your child could be newly diapered and well fed, and they’ll still find another reason to start crying. As long as you’re sure that nothing is wrong, it’s okay to allow your baby to simply cry it out sometimes. 

3. Avoid Panic

Not surprisingly, new parents tend to panic over anything and everything that happens to their child. It’s important not to waste all that time worrying when, most of the time, there’s absolutely nothing wrong. When a baby spits up, vomits, or seems a little sick, these can be taken care of fairly easily and should not force you into a panic.

4. Seek Advice

As a parent to a newborn child, you should never hesitate to seek advice from others who have more experience. Whether that means calling your doctor about a particular problem or just asking a fellow mom for a simple answer. It’s been shown that women who seek help with nursing issues have a much higher success rate, and this can apply to most topics of childcare.

5. Perfect Parenting

One of the most important things to remember throughout your journey with a newborn child is that there’s no secret to perfect parenting. Reading and researching best practices for various parenting topics and issues is always a great idea, but you must ultimately make the judgment for how you will raise your child.

6. Have Fun 

Throughout all the sleepless nights and hours spent trying to soothe your child, don’t forget to enjoy the entire experience! Time flies when we’re wrapped up in our daily jobs and activities, and it seems to pass by even faster with a child. Take plenty of pictures, keep notes in the baby book, and have fun all along the way!

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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How to Make Vegetables Fun to Eat for Kids

How to Make Vegetables Fun to Eat for KidsVery few kids love to eat their vegetables. Even the tastiest vegetable isn’t palatable to most children, who prefer sweeter flavors (honestly, who doesn’t?). So in many homes, getting kids to eat their vegetables is a chore. But it doesn’t have to be! While a few simple tricks, you can make vegetables fun and exciting so your kids will want to eat them. Use these tips.

1. Arrange it in fun ways

Kids find simple things the most funny. You don’t have to do much to impress them. They also almost universally prefer their food separated into groups (whereas you and I don’t mind if things get mashed together). You can make the vegetable experience fun by arranging them into please shapes. For example, two slices of zucchini and circular pile of peas make Mikey Mouse ears.

2. All Veggie Nachos

All Veggie Nachos

Who doesn’t love nachos? Everyone, but these aren’t your typical nachos. They’re fun, colorful, easy to make quickly and 100% healthy. See the recipe.

3. Make your kids a part of the process

You can add an element of fun by involving your kids in the cooking process, from planning meals to shopping and preparing food. This gives them ownership and makes them feel like they are contributing to the family. Plus they’ll enjoy all the sensations and motions of handling food.

4. Make smoothies

The beauty of a smoothie is that you can pack a lot of nutritional stuff inside, but the flavors are hidden with just small amounts of yogurt, fruit and orange juice. Realistically you can include anything, even vegetables they would never eat at the table, like kale and spinach.

5. Turn eating into a game

This piece of advice solves a lot of parenting challenges!

If you can turn something unpleasant into a fun game, kids focus on the game aspect and don’t worry about the uncomfortable sensation. Compete to see who can eat the most of their broccoli, or who can take the most bites of their carrots. Work vegetables into other family games, like trivia: when you answer a question wrong, you have to take a bite.

6. Add their favorite flavors

Bitter vegies don’t have to stay that way! Dress up vegetables with their favorite flavors. For example, squeeze orange juice over broccoli, add mint to peas, and add salad dressing to… just about anything. They’ll enjoy the flavor while they eat their vegetables.

How do you get your kids to eat their vegetables?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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How to Sanitize Your Baby Products: 3 Steps to Keep All That Gear Clean

How to Sanitize Baby ProductsWhere you and I have an experienced immune system that defeats bacteria, disease and infection every day, our little ones’ don’t. Your child is most vulnerable to disease and infection during the first two years of their life. Their bodies will become naturally accustomed to the world over time, but it’s still important to limit the amount of harmful substances they come in contact with.

Step one: clean with soapy water

Baby products are especially coated with germs because, well, babies are germy. They touch absolutely everything, their faces, their mouths, and anything they can touch. You don’t need a special anti-bacterial soap. Drop your baby gear in the sink or tub and give it a fair scrub with hot soapy water. This will do a majority of the cleaning.

Make sure you clean your items thoroughly. Babies can make messes everywhere. For example, get into the corners and crevices of that high chair to make sure you found every pea and noodle.

Step two: sanitize your gear

Sanitizing means using a special solution to specifically kill any remaining organisms. It’s important you follow step one first, because your sanitizer won’t necessarily remove dirt, grease and grime – and this is where germs can hide.

The simplest way to make a sanitizing solution is to mix one quart of water with ¼ cup bleach. Properly diluted to this degree, bleach is non-toxic, but if you prefer to avoid bleach, there are plenty of non-bleach-based sanitizing solutions you can buy.

Fill a sink with your sanitizer and dip your gear (bottles, nipples, toys, and anything that’s safe in water) into the sink. They don’t need to soak in the sanitizer, just sit there a few seconds. Then, let them air dry on the counter. If your items don’t fit in the sink for a dip, soak a rag in the sanitizer and completely wipe down the item.

Alternatively, you can use your dishwasher. The water in the dishwasher gets so hot that it functions like a sanitizer and kills everything. If your items can safely be washed inside, that’s your best bet. In this case you usually don’t have to do a prewash unless you really feel that the item is dirty.

Step three: store your items properly

If you’re washing an item to pack it away, make sure you pack them away in a manner that won’t ruin your hard work, especially if you’ll be packing them away in the attic or basement. Wrap loose items in plastic or cloth so they don’t pick up dust, germs and insects. Ideally, you want to place them a few inches off the ground to protect against potential water or rodent damage.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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The Pros and Cons of Using a Pacifier for Your Baby

should you use a pacifier for babyYou’ve met all of your child’s needs, but he/she is still crying. What’s a parent to do? If you find yourself in this position, you’re probably desperate for a way to calm your baby down. Many parents rely on a pacifier to stop the tears, but some wonder if this is healthy.

Here are the pros and cons of pacifiers so you can decide for yourself.

The Pros

  • Crying is stress, so you want to minimize it as much as possible. Babies instinctually suck and find the motion soothing. Any parent will tell you that a pacifier is an effective way to calm down a baby.
  • A 1992 Swedish medical journal found that premature babies gain weight faster when they are allowed unrestricted use of a pacifier. The same study also found that pacifier babies had less health complications overall.
  • Sucking promotes oral muscle and control development, which helps your baby learn to speak and manipulate pureed and eventually solid foods.
  • There is a clear correlation between pacifier use and a reduced risk of SIDS. We aren’t entirely sure why, but the cause-and-effect relationship is clear.

The Cons

  • A 1995 study in Pediatrics found that pacifiers were responsible for 25% of all ear infections because the sucking collects fluid in the mouth, nasal cavity and ear canal. However, restricting pacifier use to only help a baby fall asleep (that is, not letting your baby have it all day) brought the risk back to normal.
  • It’s possible for some parents to have a tendency to use the pacifier as the first solution, instead of, say, offering a snack or checking the diaper.
  • A pacifier given too early can cause nipple confusion. Nipple confusion is when your baby doesn’t understand the difference between a pacifier/bottle and a breast nipple. Artificial nipples are easier to suck on, so some babies grow to prefer them.
  • Children who suck on pacifiers (or fingers or anything) past the age of two risk developing protruding teeth and possibly a cross bite.
  • After some time of relying on the pacifier to calm down and go to sleep, your baby might find it tough to give up. The longer you wait, the harder it will be. Also, some parents find it difficult to deny their child a pacifier because they know how effective it can be.

In the end, most parents opt for the same solution: they use a pacifier in moderation, but take it away before it becomes a crutch that their child can’t live without. Personally, I think this is the sensible solution, but it’s up to your family.

Did you give your children a pacifier? Tell us your experience.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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3 Tips to Ease the Daylight Savings Transition

daylight savings time baby sleep tipsMarch 13th starts Daylight Savings Time, meaning we’re going to push our clocks ahead an hour. That leaves us each with one hour of less sleep that day. While you and I can tough it out for a day and adjust pretty quickly, babies and small children often have a tougher time.

If you’re one of the lucky families that doesn’t have to adhere to a schedule, the simplest solution is often to just do nothing. If you have nowhere to be in the morning (no work or daycare), then letting your kids sleep until they’re rested is often best. But if you’re like many families, you have to get the kids to the sitter so you can get to work.

Instead of just toughing out the change, we can use the weeks beforehand (starting now) to make some gradual changes so no one has to deal with crankiness or fussiness come mid-March.

1. Adjust your daily schedule in small intervals

Each day, gradually shift your child’s schedule a small amount of time earlier. Depending on how far you start the transition will decide how big these intervals have to be. If you start now, you only have to shift everything about five minutes. But if you start just a few days before the time change, you may have to shift everything fifteen minutes.

When I say everything, I mean everything. Shift the meal times a few minutes earlier. Shift nap times, play times, times of the day you usually run errands, or anything else. Even though these things may seem trivial, your child’s body relies on them as cues to build his day. Go to bed a few minutes earlier and hope your child wakes up an equal amount of time earlier.

2. Don’t push too hard

If you feel that waking up a bit earlier had an adverse effect on your child, hold that schedule for another day or two to give your child a chance to get used to it. Don’t shift everything another interval until you’ve caught up from the first one. This is another reason it’s best to start the transition as early as possible.

If you make it to Daylight Savings Time schedule a few days before the actual change, that’s quite alright.

3. Always prioritize sleep

Sleep is a hugely important part of your child’s development. Chronically tired babies have a hard time learning in school and adapting to social settings. They even grow less! It’s important that your family value the amount of sleep you get – especially for your baby. If you have a less adaptable child who is sensitive to his/her sleep schedule, consider taking a day or two off work during this change so you can limit your obligations and let your child sleep soundly.

Remember: good sleep is an investment for families. A well-rested child means a well-rested family!

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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Why Do Babies Startle Themselves Awake?

Why Do Babies Startle Themselves AwakeThe startle reflex (officially called the Moro Reflex) is one of the several reflexes babies are born with. This group is called the infantile reflexes.

Technically, your baby has the reflex when he or she is in the womb. They start to gain this reflex around 28 weeks (although it’s incomplete – we can tell by observing premature babies) and have it officially by 34 weeks. We can sometimes see babies startle in the womb, but this isn’t common (you’ll see why in a minute).

The reflex activates when your child has a sudden feeling of a loss of support – or falling. There are three components to this reflex. These actions happen very quickly together.

  • Baby’s arms will spread out suddenly
  • Baby’s arm will come together suddenly like he/she is trying to catch something
  • Baby will be irritable and often cry a bit.

The reflex is active at birth and fades around four or five months old.

So why do babies startle?

For a long time, babies were carried by their mothers all day. We still do a lot of this today, but there was a long stretch of human history where people were nomadic – following the seasons and food sources all over. In evolutionary terms, that time wasn’t very long ago.

So the theory is that the startle reflex is an evolutionary trait that helped babies cling to their mother if they fell, or at the very least make enough of a commotion to alert mom that baby has separated. It’s not very effective for infants, but it’s quite possible for a four or five month old baby to catch him/herself.

Why is the startle reflex a pain for parents?

Babies can startle in their sleep, which is frustrating for parents because it wakes their children up. During the first months of life, a baby needs to be sleeping pretty much every minute they aren’t eating. Parents spend an enormous amount of time putting their infants to sleep, which can be instantly wrecked by a poorly-timed startle.

How do we prevent the startle reflex?

Technically, you can’t stop the startling from happening. It’s a reflex in their brain that we can’t adjust. The best thing we can do is work around it.

The best solution is to swaddle. A swaddle works in three ways.

  1. It help prevents the reflex from occurring because baby always feels confined and safe. When baby feels pressure all over, there’s no sense of falling or loss of balance.
  2. It reduces the impact of the startle. When a swaddled baby startles, he/she is instantly comforted and confined. Their movement is limited so they’re less likely to wake themselves up.
  3. If they are woken up, the swaddle is the perfect environment to fall back to sleep.

You can’t beat the startle reflex, but you can work around it. Hopefully this information helps you help your baby sleep better.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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4 Fascinating Facts About Your Baby’s Sleep

baby sleep factsBaby sleep is an exceptionally interesting topic. At first glance, it seems straightforward. Sleep is just sleep, right? Not with babies! There are a ton of interesting ways baby sleep differs from adult sleep. Here are some interesting facts every parent should know.

1. Closed eyes don’t mean your baby is asleep

Just like you and I, babies clothes their eyes when they’re tired, but this doesn’t mean they’re asleep. You have to look for the signs of deep sleep very carefully. A baby in deep sleep is relaxed, limp, and breathing very slowly and deeply. This is a good time to lay your baby down.

A baby with fluttering eyes, a tense body, and erratic breathing is still in light sleep (also known as REM sleep) and might wake up if moved around too much.

2. Sleep begets sleep

Contrary to popular belief, keeping your child awake doesn’t make them sleep longer later. A baby who is forced to stay awake when he/she wants to sleep will become cranky, irritable, and have a hard time settling down when they do get time to sleep. Chronically fatigued children have poor sleep and more frequent wake-ups.

Always remember: a well-rested person rests best. This means that a routine that prioritizes sleep whenever your baby needs it is the best way to get more sleep.

3. The light sleep is important

It’s a fact that all infants are light sleepers, but it’s not a coincidence. Babies sleep lightly for survival purposes. They need to be able to wake up when they feel hungry. If they sleep too deeply, they might sleep through their hunger, miss a feeding, and this can compromise their development.

You might be relieved to have a two-month old who sleeps six or seven consecutive hours, but this actually isn’t a good thing. Babies need to eat every few hours to maintain their growth. You might have try dream-feeding or (as tough as this sounds), wake your baby up.

4. The dark/light cycle is important

When your baby is born, he/she doesn’t understand to sleep at night. In the womb, everything was dark. They have to develop this rhythm over time. You can help by making their sleep environment as dark as possible and making their play environment well-lit with natural light.

Slowly, you can use this rhythm to your advantage by making a room darker to stimulate sleepiness and brighter to stimulate wakefulness.

What was the most interesting thing you learned about sleep when you became a parent?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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8 Tips to Make Your Child’s Sleepover a Success

childs sleep over tipsOnce your kids begin to build meaningful relationships with their peers, they almost instantly want to partake in a sleepover. Some sleepovers are just two friends, others are whole parties. Here are some tips to make the first one a success.

1. Don’t worry so much about the age – It’s tough to say when a child is ready to spend the night away from mom and dad. Some kids don’t mind the separation, while others do. Don’t get hung up on a number. Your first step is to ask your child and gauge their reaction.

2. Have a “mock” sleepover – This is technically just a regular sleepover, but you host it at your house. Have one or a few friends over your home for the night. Let them stay up all night and sleep in the living room, or whatever they want to do. This will give your child a practice run.

3. Give the host parents a heads up – If your child sleep walks, occasionally wets the bed, has a dietary need, or anything like that, call the hosts ahead of time to make them aware. You want them to be prepared to care for your child like you would, even if that means preparing for something slightly embaressing.

4. Pick the right night – Obviously a school night isn’t a good time because you know kids won’t spend much time sleeping. Choose a night where you have nothing going on the next morning so your child can catch up on his/her sleep.

5. Have reasonable expectations – Even though sleep is important, so is socializing with one’s peers. Don’t insist on a bedtime or try to police the movies they watch and food they eat. This is a time for indulging a bit. Let kids be kids.

6. Be prepared to change plans – Many children think they can handle the sleepover, but call mom or dad at two in the morning wanting to come home. There’s a good chance it might happen, so be prepared to take a late-night drive.

7. Give them something to do – Depending on your child’s age, you might not want them to sit around idly watching TV or (worse) finding some way to get into trouble. Send your child with a board game or activity or anything fun to fall back on.

8. Start with something familiar – To get you child adjusted to sleeping away from home, start having sleepovers at a familiar place, like grandma and grandpa’s house, or their usual babysitter’s home. This will make them comfortable with the idea of sleeping in another bed.

Tell us about your child’s first sleepover experience.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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Free Organic Bodysuit + Nine Harmful Chemicals Found in Most Baby Clothes

organic baby clothes giveawayOur friends over at Cutie Bees organic baby clothing are giving away a FREE, organic bodysuit for babies and toddlers!  First 50 orders!  Adorable designs.  We love the tips from the Cutie Bees Non-Toxic Mommy Blog and learned so much.  As a parent it’s scary to know that our kids’ clothes are drenched with harmful chemicals and toxins.  Here are some important tips and please share to help spread the word. Plus the link to get your free bodysuit is below.

Why Choose Non-Toxic Clothing?

More than 8,000 chemicals are used in clothing manufacture; it’s a sure bet you and your kids are wearing many as you read this. Most of these chemicals contain carcinogenic ingredients, neurotoxins, endocrine disruptors and allergens that could be downright hazardous to your health. Did you know “organic”, “sustainable” and “eco-friendly” does not mean the clothes do not contain any toxic chemicals as well?

Why it matters more to YOUR baby:

When toxins are absorbed through your skin — your largest organ — they bypass your liver, the organ responsible for removing toxins.

YOUR baby’s skin is more porous than adult skin making it easy for the chemicals present in clothing to enter into their internal organs that are still developing and maturing. There are “critical periods” in early childhood development when exposure to a toxin can permanently alter the way an individual’s biological system operates. Not every baby is same, so while these chemicals may appear to develop itching, skin rashes, swelling, dermatitis and eczema in some, they may not appear to bother others. If your baby has mysterious health symptoms that you can’t seem to get control over, it’s worth checking out whether your baby’s clothes could be the problem.

Nine harmful chemicals found in most baby clothing:

  1. Formaldehyde // used to give a permanent press effect to clothing, to increase stain resistance and for color fasting. Other chemical names include Formalin, Methanal, Methyl aldehyde, Methylene oxide, Morbicid acid, and Oxymethylene. The dangers: EPA links formaldehyde to eye, nose, and throat irritation; wheezing and coughing; fatigue; skin rash; and severe allergic reactions. Known to cause cancer and may trigger asthma attacks.
  2. Phthalates // There are around 50 or so different types of phthalates out of which 6 are banned by CPSIA in children’s toys and child care articles. These chemicals are not restricted from use in children’s clothing. The dangers: phthalates belong to the family of endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs and are known hormone disrupters linked with birth defects, breast cancer, infertility, liver cancer, diabetes, obesity, and now with autism and ADHD in pregnancy.
  3. PBDEs or polybrominated diphenyl ethers // are known neurotoxins used as flame retardant in consumer products including children clothing. In a research report released by CDC in 2008, 97% Americans had flame retardants in their blood, and those ages 12 to 19 had the highest levels. The dangers: research studies in humans showed thyroid disruption, memory and learning problems, delayed mental and physical development, lower IQ, advanced puberty and reduced fertility.
  4. Antimony // used as a catalyst in the making of polyester. Also, used as a flame retardant in sleepwear. In higher concentrations, it can act like the poison arsenic. The dangers: depression, vomiting, dizziness, kidney and liver damage. One of the compounds, antimony trioxide is also believed to be carcinogenic.
  5. NPEs or nonylphenol ethoxylates or nonylphenols // are used to wash clothing in the textile industry, for example after dying. The dangers: NPEs are also endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs – but unlike phthalates, NPEs can accumulate in the tissues of a living being.
  6. PFCs or per- and poly-fluorinated chemicals // are used to make textiles water-repellent. PFCs are thus mainly found in outerwear, such as rain jackets and shoes. But they can also be found in training pants, waterproof crib mattress covers and other items in your baby’s nursery. The dangers: PFCs are linked with cancer and kidney diseases.
  7. Organotins // are used as a biocide largely in cotton clothing to prevent textiles from being damaged. It is also used to provide anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties and prevent odor if a wearer were to sweat. The dangers: linkage with obesity along with having immunotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects.
  8. Pesticides and Insecticides // broad spectrum organophosphates and carbamate pesticides used in conventional cotton farming are some of the most common, and most toxic pesticides used today, adversely affecting the human nervous system even at low levels of exposure. Cotton is grown on just 2.5% of the world’s total agricultural land, but uses 22.5% of the world’s insecticides and 10% of all pesticides, making it the world’s dirtiest grown crop. The dangers: interference with healthy neurodevelopment, leading to behavioral problems and lower cognitive function, and meet the diagnostic criteria for ADHD. These toxins also belong to the family of endocrine disrupting chemicals or EDCs and are known hormone disrupters. EPA classifies these as carcinogens and acknowledges having linkages to neurological disorders that increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease.
  9. Synthetic Colors/Dyes // is a mixture of many chemicals including formaldehyde and heavy metals. The dangers: carcinogenic and the heavy metal particles are known neurotoxins.

The Cutie Bees brand is known for their healthy, non-toxic apparel for baby and kids. With Cutie Bees, you never have to worry about the harmful chemicals hiding in your baby’s clothing. These clothes are made from 100% certified organic cotton and are hand finished without any harmful chemicals. Cutie Bees follows strict procedures and inspections throughout the entire process. And, they even test their products to ensure no harmful chemicals were found in Cutie Bees baby clothes before they are sold.

The Cutie Bees promise:

  • NO harmful dyes
  • NO pesticides
  • NO phthalates
  • NO formaldehyde
  • NO fire-retardants
  • NO harmful chemicals ever!

Cutie Bees is giving away a FREE bodysuit for 50 new customers! From February 1st through February 7th, the first 50 people to sign up will win a *free organic bodysuit – a $20 value! Choose from sizes 0-24 months and an assortment of colors. *$3.95 shipping charge applies.

Get Your FREE BODYSUIT Here

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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6 Tips for Avoiding the Flu as a Family

how to avoid flu as familyWell, it’s flu season. The trouble with the flu is that it’s an ever-changing virus. Every year it’s different, that’s why we can get it over and over. It changes just enough to get by our bodies’ defenses. We make vaccines every year, but they’re ineffective the next year. A flu, while simple to treat, can bring a person down for several days. Here are some basic tips for your family to avoid the flu.

1. Wash your hands

This can’t be stated enough. Washing your hands is the single most important thing you can do to prevent the spread of any disease. Getting them wet doesn’t cut, either. You have to use soap. Sing the song “Row, row, row your boat” to make sure you wash long enough.

2. Get a flu shot

The CDC recommends that everyone who is at least six months old get a flu vaccine each year, but it’s especially important for children and the elderly (who have weakened immune systems). The flu shot is extremely effective. Even if you get the flu, it helps reduce the severity of your symptoms.

3. Don’t touch other people

Obviously you can’t avoid contact is everyone, but only touch the people you have to. On average, people touch their own faces twice a minute, so touching someone else is basically the same as touching them inside their body. Avoid what contact you can during this season.

4. Disinfect your surfaces

Germs can live on a surface for as long as a day, so it’s important you disinfect public surfaces. But this means more than just your countertops. You can disinfect phones, computers, keyboards and toys. Make sure you wash your dishes in the hottest water you can manage (dishwashers are great).

5. Cough into your elbow

At one time, we were all taught to cough into our hands, but that’s bad advice now, because we use our hands to touch basically everything. Teach your kids to cough into the inside of their elbow. Sure, they’ll get germs on their sleeve, but they won’t spread them.

6. Avoid sick people

If someone in your home comes down with the flu, quarantine them as reasonably as you can. Limit all contact, especially touching. It’s for the best that skip goodnight hugs until everyone is feeling 100%.

Did anyone in your family have the flu this year?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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