6 Tips to Transition Back to Work after Being a Stay at Home Mom

how to transition back to work after babyIf you decided to stay home with the kids, there will probably be a time when you decide to go back to work. This happens to a lot of moms. Once the kids are school, you look around an empty house and wonder what you’re supposed to do. Some moms find it tough to make the transition back to work, so hopefully these tips help.

1. Assess your situation

Make sure you understand why you are going back to work. If you don’t have a goal in mind, you won’t be sure if the choice is fulfilling. Do you need the money? Do you want your career back? Do you just want adult conversation? All of those are find reasons, but understanding why will help you find a new job that meets your needs.

2. Look for mom-friendly jobs

You might need something other than the typical 9-5 to meet the needs of your family. Part time work might be for you, or perhaps you can find something that allows you to work from home. Seek out employers that are especially friendly to families.

3. Practice interviewing

Like anything else, interviewing takes training. Keep in mind that at this time in your life, you can’t accept just any job. It has to fit your life, whether that means a certain compensation, certain benefits, certain schedule, etc. So an interview is just as much for them as it is for you. Bring a list of questions with you to the interview so you can make sure it’s right for you.

4. Be flexible with position and compensation

Keep in mind that being out of the workforce for a while will take a toll on your career. You’ll understandably be behind in a few ways. You won’t be able to jump back into your old job. Accept that you might have to take a lesser position for a while until you acclimate yourself. Don’t be ashamed of taking a simpler job; all honest work is good.

5. Cut your obligations

Even if you’re only introducing a part time job, you have to cut back some of the extra things you do every week so you don’t run yourself too thin. You may have to leave the PTA or stop being the basketball coach. You might have to leave your book club or start preparing some less elaborate meals. Don’t feel like you have to keep the same pace.

6. Hold a trial run

It can be a big change for the family when mom has to be out of the house in the morning. Arrange a trail run a few weeks before you go back that simulates the experience so you can iron out any kinks before you really have somewhere to be. Set your alarm and get everyone through their morning routine as if you have to go to work. Even drop them off with the babysitter for a while. You don’t have to disappear all day, but this will give you the option to solve problems before they become big problems.

How did you adjust when you went back to work?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Parenting Tips | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Treating Infant Torticollis

Treating Infant TorticollisDoes my baby have Torticollis?

Torticollis is a common condition among infants. Don’t worry, there are many different ways to prevent and correct this issue.

Torticollis can basically cause an infant to hold her head tilted and/or turned to one side instead of centered in the middle. Due to the tight neck muscles forming and resting in that same position in the womb with limited space. Another case could be how the baby is positioned at home. This results in muscle development at a different rate than surrounding muscles. In any case, it is important to correct the problem early.

How to know if your baby is diagnosed with Torticollis?

You may not need a CAT scan or x-ray. Simply take your baby to the pediatrician if you feel your child is having difficult turning his head.  Your family health care provider can complete a quick routine check to see if your baby has Torticollis.

The quick routine check consist of moving  your baby’s head from side to side, feeling the muscles in his neck, and monitoring  your baby while laying down or in your lap.

Why is treating Torticollis so important?

Early treatment is highly recommended for any baby assumed to have Torticollis. It could affect the appearance of the baby’s head or body long-term if not treated in the early stages. Torticollis could even affect their learning process.

For example if left untreated a baby is at risk for learning to move with his head tilted causing a child to use one side of his body more than the other which may show a delay in their motor skills. Torticollis could also cause your baby to have a flattened head on one side or grow to have a curve in their spine as an adult.

That’s why it is crucial to treat the issue as young as possible.  As your child grows older, it becomes more difficult to correct and the muscle tightness is permanent.

How to treat and prevent Torticollis 

Torticollis treatment is a series of stretching techniques and lengthening exercises to help relieve the tight muscles in your baby’s neck. Your doctor may recommend that you try placing your baby on her side and moving her back to the other side in a rolling motion to move and stretch the body.

Be mindful of the way you support the neck when carrying the baby, always reposition the head and never leave the child in a swing or car seat too long. This will ensure the baby is using correct muscles to hold up his head. When you lay your baby down remember to reposition your baby away from the object of interest (like a toy) so she has to use her neck muscles to move and see it. This will strengthen her muscles. Lastly, rest the baby on your stomach to lay and play throughout the day.

Keep in mind

  • Remember to put baby back on his or her back for sleep
  • Expect your baby to cry during stretching activities. You are not hurting your baby
  • Your child will be finished with treatment when your child is keeping his head in the middle

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Baby Sick | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Different Sleeping Positions Benefits for Pregnant Moms

Motherhood reinvents a woman. It opens up a whole new chapter of her life where her world is no longer hers alone. This life journey is not without hardships and challenges. American actress and mother Ricki Lake sums up motherhood perfectly: “Motherhood is the greatest thing and the hardest thing.”

The struggles start during pregnancy. Johns Hopkins Medicine warns that the first trimester of pregnancy is critical to the health of the mother and her unborn child. It is important that both receive adequate nutrition and rest. As the pregnancy progresses, so do a mother’s sleeping problems.

Most pregnant moms experience fragmented sleep and insomnia. Many struggle falling asleep, staying asleep and getting enough rest. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center suggest correlation between a mother’s quality of sleep and complications at birth. There are also alarming evidence that point to the impact of sleep and depression to the mother and her unborn child’s immune health.

Sleeping problems among pregnant women are primarily attributed to the larger abdomen, back pain, heartburn, shortness of breath and insomnia. All these factors add up to the fact that there are certain sleeping positions that should be avoided at least during the latter part of the pregnancy.

Here are facts you should know to help pregnant women sleep better.

Different sleeping positions to avoid

Different sleeping positions to avoid

To know what sleeping positions work for pregnant moms, you should understand the basic changes in your body during this crucial period. Back sleeping causes the weight of your uterus to press on your spine and major blood vessels, resulting to back pains and decreased blood flow. Mothers who lie flat on their back complain of muscle aches, hemorrhoids and swelling. They also suffer from dizziness due to a drop in blood pressure and sleep apnea.

Dr. Vera Stucky from the University of California – San Diego Medical Center says, “If you sleep on your back, the enlarged uterus presses against the inferior vena cava, the vein that returns blood from the lower body to the heart.”

If you were used to sleeping on your stomach, this sleeping position is virtually impossible during your pregnancy. This will press down your stomach on your expanding uterus. Additionally, your ballooning breasts are extra sensitive during this period.

Pregnant sleeping position: the SOS

Pregnant sleeping position

SOS or “sleep on side” is recommended by doctors to help expectant mothers get better rest at night. This position keeps the unborn child’s weight from applying pressure to the the mom’s  inferior vena cava that carries blood back to the heart from the lower part of the body.

For a comfortable SOS position, lay on one side and put a pillow between your bent legs. You can also place a pillow under your abdomen to ease any back discomfort. This can help prevent you from rolling to your stomach or back.

Rotating positions throughout the night is fine. Don’t panic if you find yourself on your back in the middle of the night. Just return to your side and go back to sleep.

Pregnant sleeping position: the left side

Pregnant sleeping position

There is no scientific evidence that explicitly tells the better side to sleep on. However, caregivers recommend the left side as the safest for your baby.

This sleeping position will increase the amount of blood and nutrients in the placenta, allowing blood flow to the fetus, uterus, and kidneys. Sleeping on your left side also keeps your weight from pushing down too hard on your liver.

Pregnant sleeping position: the half-sitting position

Pregnant sleeping position 3

Adequate rest is vital for expectant mothers. Finding a comfortable sleeping position is one of the effective ways for pregnant women to get better sleep. You may lie on your back in a half-sitting position with soft pillows against your back. Resting in this position on a soft bed can be helpful in keeping stomach acids down and prevent heartburn.

Create a conducive sleeping environment

Create a conducive sleeping environment

Sleeping during pregnancy can be tough given the many discomforts you feel inside your body. Apart from finding a safe and comfortable sleeping position, it is important to turn your bedroom into an optimal resting environment.

Get a new bed, mattress and a set of pillows, if necessary. A firmer mattress, especially a memory foam mattress, can help ease aches on your torso and limbs. Invest in good pillows as these can offer good bed support. If you experience shortness of breath, put a pillow under your side to raise your upper body. It is also advisable to place a pillow at the small of your back when on a half-sitting position to relieve some pressure. A full-body pillow behind your back when you’re on a side-sleeping position can reduce back pains.

One of the sleeping position benefits for pregnant moms is better rest. An early research found that mothers who slept fewer than six hours per night had longer labors. They were also 4.5 times more likely to have a Cesarean delivery. Make sure you get at least eight hours of uninterrupted sleep each night. By the time your baby arrives, you’d have to prepare for sleepless nights, fatigues and stress. Oh, the wonders of parenthood!

Guest Blog by Emily Harper

Emily Harper is an Environment/Sustainability/Health and Women Advocate. She is also fond of analyzing home structure and design and has been a Home Stylist and Consultant. She is also an active community member, concerning community improvement and security. She loves to write as much as she loves to cook and bake cupcakes for her two little kids.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Pregnancy Tips | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Signs That Your Toddler Can Handle a Big Kid Bed

when is toddler ready for a bedMoving your child into their own bed is a big step for every family. Even the best transitions involve a couple sleepless nights of walking your child back to bed. It’s inevitable.

However, it can be tough to judge when your child is ready. Ultimately, you’ll have to decide for yourself. I don’t recommend selling off your crib until you’re sure that your child can handle a toddler bed. Sometimes you have to take a step back and that’s OK.

Here are some signs that your child is ready for a big kid bed.

1. Your child is climbing out of the crib

Kids climb out of the crib at different ages, but when it starts to happen, you have to worry about safety. There are some other things you can do, like install bulky bumpers on top of the rail to prevent your child from gaining purchase, but the easiest solution is to give them their own bed.

2. Your child can play unsupervised

If your child sleeps in a bed, they are more than capable of getting up at night and wandering around your house while everyone else is asleep. You have to make sure the thought of that doesn’t scare you. Even if your home is childproofed, you have to consider their skill level. What can they get into?

3. Your child doesn’t like the crib

Many kids are ready to move to their own bed when they display negative feelings toward they crib. They think it’s for babies because their old siblings and parents don’t sleep in one. It’s important to entertain the idea of a toddler bed at this point because you don’t want your child to develop a negative association with sleep, or they’ll refuse to go to bed.

4. Your child understands “boundaries”

You need to be able to impress upon your child imaginary boundaries. They need to know that it’s important to stay in bed during sleep time, or you’ll spend hours every night waiting with them while they fall asleep. If your kid immediately jumps out of bed, then the crib bars are still necessary to ensure they get to sleep.

5. Your child wants a bed

The best time to move into a new phase in your child’s life is when they are most ready, so if your child is asking for a toddler bed, jump on the opportunity. Children are much more likely to embrace something on their own terms.

How did you know your child was ready?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Baby Sleep | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Newborn Care Tips for New Parents

Newborn Care Tips for New ParentsBringing home a newborn baby can be a very hectic, exciting, and confusing time for parents. There is so much information that you will learn on your own throughout the parenting process, but it never hurts to read up and do some research. While it can definitely be an overwhelming time in your life, all that matters is that you’re striving to be the best parent you can be. Here are some helpful tips for newborn care:

1. Early and Often

Anything that you expect your child to learn as they grow and develop be sure to start as early as possible. Get a head start on communicating with them, potty training, basic shapes and colors, counting, and anything else you can think of to practice. Even though you know they won’t be able to respond with words from the start, there’s nothing wrong with getting them used to communication.

2. Cry it Out

A newborn baby will inevitably cry – a lot! Since new parents aren’t familiar with this reaction to almost anything, it’s easy to see how this could cause some trouble. Your child could be newly diapered and well fed, and they’ll still find another reason to start crying. As long as you’re sure that nothing is wrong, it’s okay to allow your baby to simply cry it out sometimes. 

3. Avoid Panic

Not surprisingly, new parents tend to panic over anything and everything that happens to their child. It’s important not to waste all that time worrying when, most of the time, there’s absolutely nothing wrong. When a baby spits up, vomits, or seems a little sick, these can be taken care of fairly easily and should not force you into a panic.

4. Seek Advice

As a parent to a newborn child, you should never hesitate to seek advice from others who have more experience. Whether that means calling your doctor about a particular problem or just asking a fellow mom for a simple answer. It’s been shown that women who seek help with nursing issues have a much higher success rate, and this can apply to most topics of childcare.

5. Perfect Parenting

One of the most important things to remember throughout your journey with a newborn child is that there’s no secret to perfect parenting. Reading and researching best practices for various parenting topics and issues is always a great idea, but you must ultimately make the judgment for how you will raise your child.

6. Have Fun 

Throughout all the sleepless nights and hours spent trying to soothe your child, don’t forget to enjoy the entire experience! Time flies when we’re wrapped up in our daily jobs and activities, and it seems to pass by even faster with a child. Take plenty of pictures, keep notes in the baby book, and have fun all along the way!

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in New Mom | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Make Vegetables Fun to Eat for Kids

How to Make Vegetables Fun to Eat for KidsVery few kids love to eat their vegetables. Even the tastiest vegetable isn’t palatable to most children, who prefer sweeter flavors (honestly, who doesn’t?). So in many homes, getting kids to eat their vegetables is a chore. But it doesn’t have to be! While a few simple tricks, you can make vegetables fun and exciting so your kids will want to eat them. Use these tips.

1. Arrange it in fun ways

Kids find simple things the most funny. You don’t have to do much to impress them. They also almost universally prefer their food separated into groups (whereas you and I don’t mind if things get mashed together). You can make the vegetable experience fun by arranging them into please shapes. For example, two slices of zucchini and circular pile of peas make Mikey Mouse ears.

2. All Veggie Nachos

All Veggie Nachos

Who doesn’t love nachos? Everyone, but these aren’t your typical nachos. They’re fun, colorful, easy to make quickly and 100% healthy. See the recipe.

3. Make your kids a part of the process

You can add an element of fun by involving your kids in the cooking process, from planning meals to shopping and preparing food. This gives them ownership and makes them feel like they are contributing to the family. Plus they’ll enjoy all the sensations and motions of handling food.

4. Make smoothies

The beauty of a smoothie is that you can pack a lot of nutritional stuff inside, but the flavors are hidden with just small amounts of yogurt, fruit and orange juice. Realistically you can include anything, even vegetables they would never eat at the table, like kale and spinach.

5. Turn eating into a game

This piece of advice solves a lot of parenting challenges!

If you can turn something unpleasant into a fun game, kids focus on the game aspect and don’t worry about the uncomfortable sensation. Compete to see who can eat the most of their broccoli, or who can take the most bites of their carrots. Work vegetables into other family games, like trivia: when you answer a question wrong, you have to take a bite.

6. Add their favorite flavors

Bitter vegies don’t have to stay that way! Dress up vegetables with their favorite flavors. For example, squeeze orange juice over broccoli, add mint to peas, and add salad dressing to… just about anything. They’ll enjoy the flavor while they eat their vegetables.

How do you get your kids to eat their vegetables?

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Food for baby | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Sanitize Your Baby Products: 3 Steps to Keep All That Gear Clean

How to Sanitize Baby ProductsWhere you and I have an experienced immune system that defeats bacteria, disease and infection every day, our little ones’ don’t. Your child is most vulnerable to disease and infection during the first two years of their life. Their bodies will become naturally accustomed to the world over time, but it’s still important to limit the amount of harmful substances they come in contact with.

Step one: clean with soapy water

Baby products are especially coated with germs because, well, babies are germy. They touch absolutely everything, their faces, their mouths, and anything they can touch. You don’t need a special anti-bacterial soap. Drop your baby gear in the sink or tub and give it a fair scrub with hot soapy water. This will do a majority of the cleaning.

Make sure you clean your items thoroughly. Babies can make messes everywhere. For example, get into the corners and crevices of that high chair to make sure you found every pea and noodle.

Step two: sanitize your gear

Sanitizing means using a special solution to specifically kill any remaining organisms. It’s important you follow step one first, because your sanitizer won’t necessarily remove dirt, grease and grime – and this is where germs can hide.

The simplest way to make a sanitizing solution is to mix one quart of water with ¼ cup bleach. Properly diluted to this degree, bleach is non-toxic, but if you prefer to avoid bleach, there are plenty of non-bleach-based sanitizing solutions you can buy.

Fill a sink with your sanitizer and dip your gear (bottles, nipples, toys, and anything that’s safe in water) into the sink. They don’t need to soak in the sanitizer, just sit there a few seconds. Then, let them air dry on the counter. If your items don’t fit in the sink for a dip, soak a rag in the sanitizer and completely wipe down the item.

Alternatively, you can use your dishwasher. The water in the dishwasher gets so hot that it functions like a sanitizer and kills everything. If your items can safely be washed inside, that’s your best bet. In this case you usually don’t have to do a prewash unless you really feel that the item is dirty.

Step three: store your items properly

If you’re washing an item to pack it away, make sure you pack them away in a manner that won’t ruin your hard work, especially if you’ll be packing them away in the attic or basement. Wrap loose items in plastic or cloth so they don’t pick up dust, germs and insects. Ideally, you want to place them a few inches off the ground to protect against potential water or rodent damage.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Cleaning, Mom Tips, New Mom | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Pros and Cons of Using a Pacifier for Your Baby

should you use a pacifier for babyYou’ve met all of your child’s needs, but he/she is still crying. What’s a parent to do? If you find yourself in this position, you’re probably desperate for a way to calm your baby down. Many parents rely on a pacifier to stop the tears, but some wonder if this is healthy.

Here are the pros and cons of pacifiers so you can decide for yourself.

The Pros

  • Crying is stress, so you want to minimize it as much as possible. Babies instinctually suck and find the motion soothing. Any parent will tell you that a pacifier is an effective way to calm down a baby.
  • A 1992 Swedish medical journal found that premature babies gain weight faster when they are allowed unrestricted use of a pacifier. The same study also found that pacifier babies had less health complications overall.
  • Sucking promotes oral muscle and control development, which helps your baby learn to speak and manipulate pureed and eventually solid foods.
  • There is a clear correlation between pacifier use and a reduced risk of SIDS. We aren’t entirely sure why, but the cause-and-effect relationship is clear.

The Cons

  • A 1995 study in Pediatrics found that pacifiers were responsible for 25% of all ear infections because the sucking collects fluid in the mouth, nasal cavity and ear canal. However, restricting pacifier use to only help a baby fall asleep (that is, not letting your baby have it all day) brought the risk back to normal.
  • It’s possible for some parents to have a tendency to use the pacifier as the first solution, instead of, say, offering a snack or checking the diaper.
  • A pacifier given too early can cause nipple confusion. Nipple confusion is when your baby doesn’t understand the difference between a pacifier/bottle and a breast nipple. Artificial nipples are easier to suck on, so some babies grow to prefer them.
  • Children who suck on pacifiers (or fingers or anything) past the age of two risk developing protruding teeth and possibly a cross bite.
  • After some time of relying on the pacifier to calm down and go to sleep, your baby might find it tough to give up. The longer you wait, the harder it will be. Also, some parents find it difficult to deny their child a pacifier because they know how effective it can be.

In the end, most parents opt for the same solution: they use a pacifier in moderation, but take it away before it becomes a crutch that their child can’t live without. Personally, I think this is the sensible solution, but it’s up to your family.

Did you give your children a pacifier? Tell us your experience.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Baby Development | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

3 Tips to Ease the Daylight Savings Transition

daylight savings time baby sleep tipsMarch 13th starts Daylight Savings Time, meaning we’re going to push our clocks ahead an hour. That leaves us each with one hour of less sleep that day. While you and I can tough it out for a day and adjust pretty quickly, babies and small children often have a tougher time.

If you’re one of the lucky families that doesn’t have to adhere to a schedule, the simplest solution is often to just do nothing. If you have nowhere to be in the morning (no work or daycare), then letting your kids sleep until they’re rested is often best. But if you’re like many families, you have to get the kids to the sitter so you can get to work.

Instead of just toughing out the change, we can use the weeks beforehand (starting now) to make some gradual changes so no one has to deal with crankiness or fussiness come mid-March.

1. Adjust your daily schedule in small intervals

Each day, gradually shift your child’s schedule a small amount of time earlier. Depending on how far you start the transition will decide how big these intervals have to be. If you start now, you only have to shift everything about five minutes. But if you start just a few days before the time change, you may have to shift everything fifteen minutes.

When I say everything, I mean everything. Shift the meal times a few minutes earlier. Shift nap times, play times, times of the day you usually run errands, or anything else. Even though these things may seem trivial, your child’s body relies on them as cues to build his day. Go to bed a few minutes earlier and hope your child wakes up an equal amount of time earlier.

2. Don’t push too hard

If you feel that waking up a bit earlier had an adverse effect on your child, hold that schedule for another day or two to give your child a chance to get used to it. Don’t shift everything another interval until you’ve caught up from the first one. This is another reason it’s best to start the transition as early as possible.

If you make it to Daylight Savings Time schedule a few days before the actual change, that’s quite alright.

3. Always prioritize sleep

Sleep is a hugely important part of your child’s development. Chronically tired babies have a hard time learning in school and adapting to social settings. They even grow less! It’s important that your family value the amount of sleep you get – especially for your baby. If you have a less adaptable child who is sensitive to his/her sleep schedule, consider taking a day or two off work during this change so you can limit your obligations and let your child sleep soundly.

Remember: good sleep is an investment for families. A well-rested child means a well-rested family!

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Baby Sleep | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Do Babies Startle Themselves Awake?

Why Do Babies Startle Themselves AwakeThe startle reflex (officially called the Moro Reflex) is one of the several reflexes babies are born with. This group is called the infantile reflexes.

Technically, your baby has the reflex when he or she is in the womb. They start to gain this reflex around 28 weeks (although it’s incomplete – we can tell by observing premature babies) and have it officially by 34 weeks. We can sometimes see babies startle in the womb, but this isn’t common (you’ll see why in a minute).

The reflex activates when your child has a sudden feeling of a loss of support – or falling. There are three components to this reflex. These actions happen very quickly together.

  • Baby’s arms will spread out suddenly
  • Baby’s arm will come together suddenly like he/she is trying to catch something
  • Baby will be irritable and often cry a bit.

The reflex is active at birth and fades around four or five months old.

So why do babies startle?

For a long time, babies were carried by their mothers all day. We still do a lot of this today, but there was a long stretch of human history where people were nomadic – following the seasons and food sources all over. In evolutionary terms, that time wasn’t very long ago.

So the theory is that the startle reflex is an evolutionary trait that helped babies cling to their mother if they fell, or at the very least make enough of a commotion to alert mom that baby has separated. It’s not very effective for infants, but it’s quite possible for a four or five month old baby to catch him/herself.

Why is the startle reflex a pain for parents?

Babies can startle in their sleep, which is frustrating for parents because it wakes their children up. During the first months of life, a baby needs to be sleeping pretty much every minute they aren’t eating. Parents spend an enormous amount of time putting their infants to sleep, which can be instantly wrecked by a poorly-timed startle.

How do we prevent the startle reflex?

Technically, you can’t stop the startling from happening. It’s a reflex in their brain that we can’t adjust. The best thing we can do is work around it.

The best solution is to swaddle. A swaddle works in three ways.

  1. It help prevents the reflex from occurring because baby always feels confined and safe. When baby feels pressure all over, there’s no sense of falling or loss of balance.
  2. It reduces the impact of the startle. When a swaddled baby startles, he/she is instantly comforted and confined. Their movement is limited so they’re less likely to wake themselves up.
  3. If they are woken up, the swaddle is the perfect environment to fall back to sleep.

You can’t beat the startle reflex, but you can work around it. Hopefully this information helps you help your baby sleep better.

baby swaddleWritten by Karen Barski, BSN, RN, Mother of five, Certified Infant Care Specialist & Instructor, & Inventor of the  Woombie Baby Swaddle

Karen has been an RN for 18 years, and has worked in many different nursing roles. As a Certified Infant Care Specialist, Karen counsels thousands of families yearly on a multitude of issues relating to pregnancy and infancy. Also, as a mother of five, she has invaluable experience and tips to share.

Since 2007, Karen’s company, KB Designs, has invented a line of signature baby swaddle products that have helped parents easily transition their new babies from womb to home. There are multiple designs and sizes so that babies can enjoy the comfort and security of the Woombie up until the time they begin to roll.

Each product has been created and designed by Karen because of a need she identified in her life with her five children. With convenience, safety, and fashion in mind, KB Designs has helped over a half million babies and counting!

For more information, visit www.woombie.com.

Interested in writing a guest blog for Woombie? Send your topic idea to pr@woombie.com.

All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. Woombie makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, current-ness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

Posted in Baby Sleep | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment